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LET'S TAKE ACTION

This is our first Wonderous Women CALL TO ACTION !

"IF WE DON'T ACHIEVE GENDER EQUALITY

WE WILL NEVER ACHIEVE SOCIAL JUSTICE"

                                                                                                                     Source unknown.

Sign our petition and we will send it to the Prime Minister Office, the Leader of the Opposition, the State Premiers, The Ministers for Women's Affairs  both Federal and State, and every women can copy this letter and send it to their local Federal and State Member. We will also email this petition to all the National and state womens organisations so they can get their members to sign and we can all share it with all our friends. Wonderous Women who are from different countries who haven't yet passed a law like Iceland has, can do the same. Please contact me if you would like to co-ordinate this Call to Action for your country.

This is an important issue for us Wonderous Women to get behind, as it will show the world that women are no longer going to be treated as second class citizens, worthy of less than our male colleagues. This is our time to stand up and show that united we can achieve anything. We are 50% of the world population and we have a huge untapped power to make some serious changes, to make this world more honest, equitable and fairer for women everywhere. 

Iceland and gender equality

 

Written by

Rosamond Hutt

Formative Content

Published 14 Mar 2017

 

For eight years in a row, this tiny Nordic nation has topped the World Economic Forum’s ranking of nations with the smallest gender gap. 

Image: The Global Gender Gap Report 2016

Yet, even in the country considered by the experts to be the best for gender equality, a gap still persists: Icelandic women, on average, earn 14 to 18% less than men

As part of a plan to close Iceland’s gender pay gap by 2022, the government announced a new law that will require public and private companies to pay employees equally “regardless of gender, ethnicity, sexuality or nationality”, The Associated Press (AP) reported.

Under the proposed legislation – announced on International Women’s Day – companies with 25 or more employees would have to get certification to prove that they offer equal pay for work of equal value.

Iceland has brought in measures to improve equality for women, such as quotas on corporate boards and government committees. And in 2016, female representation in the Icelandic parliament reached 48%.

However, the country’s gender pay gap has not been shrinking fast enough.

In October, thousands of women across Iceland walked out of their workplaces at 2.38pm. The pay discrepancy means that Icelandic women effectively work without pay after this time, according to unions and women’s organizations.

Iceland’s commitment to closing its gender pay gap by 2022 comes as other countries across the world are stalling on economic gender parity.

Progress has been slowing down for women at work, notably in North America, according to the Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report, which looks at progress towards equality between men and women in four key areas: health, education, economy and politics.

The four nations that lead the 2016 ranking are all Scandinavian countries, led by Iceland.

For eight years in a row, this tiny Nordic nation has topped the World Economic Forum’s ranking of nations with the smallest gender gap. 

Image: REUTERS/Shannon Stapleton - RTS11ZOI

Though other countries (and the US state of Minnesota) have “equal-salary certificate policies”, Iceland is thought to be the first to make equal pay compulsory for both private and public firms, the AP report said. 

Providing the new legislation passes through the Icelandic parliament as expected, the government hopes its Equal Pay Standard will be in force by 2020.

Equality and Social Affairs Minister Thorsteinn Viglundsson said that "the time is right to do something radical about this issue".

"Equal rights are human rights," he said. "We need to make sure that men and women enjoy equal opportunity in the workplace. It is our responsibility to take every measure to achieve that."

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